Change 4 KidsChange 4 Kids is a 501(c)(4) organization and political committee backed by several dynamic community leaders to advocate for the renewal of a half-penny sales tax to fund construction and renovation of schools in Orange County.

This bipartisan initiative was originally formed in 2002 after six referendum efforts had failed to generate some level of taxation to support public schools. Batchelor volunteered to create and lead Change 4 Kids, which ultimately garnered the support to pass the referendum with nearly 60 percent of the vote.

The measure to renew the tax will be on the ballot in the fall of 2014. If voters do not pass the extension, the initial tax will end in 2015, leaving many Orange County schools in need of major repairs and improvements.

HONORARY CHAIRS

  • John O. Burden, Sr. – president and CEO of Old Florida National Bank
  • Linda Chapin – former Mayor of Orange County
  • Rich Crotty – principal and managing partner of Richard Crotty Consulting Group, LLC and the former Mayor of Orange County in office when the tax increase was originally passed
  • Earnest DeLoach, Jr. – co-managing partner at Young DeLoach PLLC
  • Mel Martinez – former U.S. Senator & chairman of the Southeast U.S. and Latin America for JPMorgan Chase & Co.
  • Tico Perez – shareholder and treasurer with the Orlando office of Gunster, Yoakley & Stewart, P.A.

SCHOOLS IN NEED

Engelwood                      ESOak Hill ES                    Lake Como ES

Hillcrest ES                     Corner Lake MS                 Fern Creek ES

Rock Lake ES                 Durrance ES                       Kaley ES

Union Park ES                Pine Hills ES                       Southwest MS

Pine Castle ES                Lake George ES                 Cherokee School

Magnolia School Mollie Ray ES                                  Silver Star Center

Sunrise ES                       Ivey Lane ES                      Lake Gem ES

Deerwood ES                   Pershing ES                       Rolling Hills ES

Meadow Woods ES          Ventura ES                        William Frangus ES

Winegard ES                     Clarcona ES                      Maxey ES

Pinar ES                            Hungerford ES                   Hidden Oaks ES

Gateway School                Meadow Woods MS          Mid-Florida Tech

Westside Tech                   Winter Park Tech               Orlando Tech

Avalon ES                          Boone HS                          Camelot ES

Odyssey MS                      Chain of Lakes MS             Citrus ES

Colonial HS                        Endeavor ES                      Howard MS

Jones HS                           Lakeview MS                      Lawton Chiles ES

Northlake Park ES             Oakshire ES                       Ocoee MS

Olympia HS                        Palmetto ES                       Three Points ES

Timber Creek HS                Winter Park HS

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What are the needs? Why does this tax need to be continued?

An extensive facilities condition assessment determined that OCPS would have more than $2 billion in unmet facility needs over the next decade. By the time the sales tax sunsets, there will be 39 schools left in need of renovation from the 2002 list, and another 20 that were not on the list of 136 schools.

What is the difference between the original tax and now?

Essentially, the same thing is being asked. The one difference is using some of the funds on technology in our schools, which is critical to preparing students to compete at the global level since that’s how the workplace operates today. Some money from the 2002 initiative was used for technology in that it is part of the infrastructure in newer schools. School facilities must be able to support those things, such as the use of computers and digital projectors. Adequate electrical supply, fiber optic backbone and wireless drops are now part of school design. However, OCPS is considering using some proceeds from the sales tax extension on devices, which of course would also increase wireless needs, thus the need to improve that infrastructure.

How much money is estimated to be raised from renewing the tax?

It depends on the final needs assessment that will be made just before the referendum. The length of the levy will be designed to generate sufficient revenue to cover the identified needs.

How much money has the 2002 tax raised?

The half-penny sales tax generated $1,658,917,189 through the fiscal year ending June 30, 2013. The current estimate is that $2.1 billion will be raised through the life of the program ending 2015.

What did Orange County taxpayers get for that amount?

With proceeds from the 2002 sales tax, 94 schools on the list of 136 will have been renovated or replaced. One new school – Wekiva High School – was also built with sales tax proceeds. Another 43 brand new relief schools will have been built since 2002 with other funds.

What other funds are used for school construction?

A state‐required portion of property taxes (1.5 mils) and impact fees on new construction are the main sources of funding for relief schools. There are other small federal and state sources, but these constitute a fraction of available funding.

Why weren’t the total of 136 schools completed?

The big factors were the downturn in the economy and the Class Size Amendment. The passage of the Constitutional Class Size Amendment created an unfunded need of approximately $600 million. The economic downturn is expected to cause total collections to be approximately $600 million short of original estimates.

Will there be a reprioritizing of the unfinished schools on the “136 list?”

The school board has decided to stick with the order of the remaining schools.

Are new schools really needed? Hasn’t growth slowed enough to make do with what there is and add portables?

That is not the case in Orange County. During the 2012-2013 school year, the school district welcomed 2,000 new students, which equivalent to more than two new elementary schools or one and a half middle schools. For the 2013-2014 school year, OCPS added another 3,000 students. So yes, our communities need these schools.

Why doesn’t OCPS rezone the district to maximize capacity?

Allowing voluntary transfers from overcrowded schools to under-capacity schools is already doing some of that. However, even with voluntary transfers, schools are overcrowded, and with a few thousand new students per year, it will only get worse if we don’t act now. On October 15, 2013, for traditional schools, the number of students and the capacity for the total district was over by 5,126 students.

When exactly would the original sales tax end?

December 31, 2015.

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Change 4 Kids es una organización 501(c)(4) y comité político que cuenta con el apoyo de numerosos líderes comunitarios, dinámicos y dispuestos a abogar por la renovación del impuesto de medio centavo sobre las ventas para ayudar a financiar la construcción y la renovación de las escuelas en el Condado Orange.

Esta iniciativa bipartidista se originó en el año 2002, después de seis esfuerzos fallidos de referéndum con la intención de generar algún ingreso tributario que apoyara a las escuelas públicas. Batchelor se ofreció como voluntario para crear y liderar Change 4 Kids, que finalmente obtuvo el apoyo necesario para ser aprobado en referéndum con casi el 60 por ciento de los votos.

La medida para renovar el impuesto volverá a las papeletas en agosto del año 2014. Si los votantes no aprueban la extensión, el impuesto inicial culminará en el 2015, dejando a muchas escuelas del Condado Orange en necesidad de mejoras y reparaciones sustanciales.

MIEMBROS HONORARIOS

  • John O. Burden, Sr. – presidente y director general del Old Florida National Bank
  • Linda Chapin – ex Alcaldesa del Condado Orange
  • Rich Crotty – socio principal y gerente de Richard Crotty Consulting Group, LLC, además de ex Alcalde del Condado Orange al momento de la aprobación original del aumento del impuesto
  • Earnest DeLoach, Jr. – socio y cogerente de Young DeLoach PLLC
  • Mel Martinez – ex Senador de los EE.UU. y presidente del área sureste de los EE.UU. y Latinoamérica para JPMorgan Chase & Co.
  • Tico Perez – accionista y tesorero de la oficina de Orlando de Gunster, Yoakley & Stewart, P.A.

ESCUELAS NECESITADAS

 Engelwood                      ESOak Hill ES                    Lake Como ES

Hillcrest ES                     Corner Lake MS                 Fern Creek ES

Rock Lake ES                 Durrance ES                       Kaley ES

Union Park ES                Pine Hills ES                       Southwest MS

Pine Castle ES                Lake George ES                 Cherokee School

Magnolia School Mollie Ray ES                                  Silver Star Center

Sunrise ES                       Ivey Lane ES                      Lake Gem ES

Deerwood ES                   Pershing ES                       Rolling Hills ES

Meadow Woods ES          Ventura ES                        William Frangus ES

Winegard ES                     Clarcona ES                      Maxey ES

Pinar ES                            Hungerford ES                   Hidden Oaks ES

Gateway School                Meadow Woods MS          Mid-Florida Tech

Westside Tech                   Winter Park Tech               Orlando Tech

Avalon ES                          Boone HS                          Camelot ES

Odyssey MS                      Chain of Lakes MS             Citrus ES

Colonial HS                        Endeavor ES                      Howard MS

Jones HS                           Lakeview MS                      Lawton Chiles ES

Northlake Park ES             Oakshire ES                       Ocoee MS

Olympia HS                        Palmetto ES                       Three Points ES

Timber Creek HS                Winter Park HS

PREGUNTAS FRECUENTES 

¿Cuáles son las necesidades? ¿Por qué se debe continuar aplicando este impuesto?

Después de una evaluación exhaustiva de las condiciones de las instalaciones, se determinó que para la próxima década, el OCPS tendría más de $2 billones en necesidades no cumplidas en esa área. Para el momento en que el impuesto sobre las ventas culmine, habrá aún 39 escuelas de la lista del 2002 en necesidad de renovación, además de otras 20 que no aparecían en la lista de 136 escuelas.

¿Cuál es la diferencia entre el impuesto original y el actual?

En esencia, ambos se refieren a lo mismo. La diferencia se encuentra en utilizar parte de los fondos en tecnología para nuestras escuelas, lo cual es crítico para preparar a los estudiantes para que puedan competir a nivel global, puesto que así opera el mercado laboral de hoy en día. Una parte de los fondos de la iniciativa del 2002, era utilizada para tecnología, pues es un área importante en la infraestructura de las escuelas más modernas. Las instalaciones escolares deben permitir el uso de tecnologías tales como computadoras y proyectores digitales. Fuentes eléctricas adecuadas, redes de fibra óptica y puntos inalámbricos, ahora son parte del diseño de las escuelas. Sin embargo, el OCPS está considerando utilizar una cuota de los ingresos provenientes de la extensión del impuesto sobre las ventas, en dispositivos, los cuales, por supuesto, aumentarían las necesidades inalámbricas y por tanto la necesidad de mejorar dicha infraestructura.

¿Cuánto dinero se espera recaudar con la renovación del impuesto?

Depende de la evaluación final de necesidades que se llevará a cabo justo antes del referéndum. La extensión de la recaudación será diseñada para generar suficientes ingresos para cubrir las necesidades identificadas.

¿Cuánto dinero se recaudó con el impuesto del año 2002?

El impuesto de medio centavo sobre las ventas generó $1,658,917,189 hasta en año fiscal que terminó el 30 de junio de 2013. El estimado actual es que se recaudarán $2.1 billones a lo largo de la duración total del programa, que termina en 2015.

¿Qué obtuvieron a cambio los contribuyentes del Condado Orange por ese monto?

Con los ingresos provenientes del impuesto sobre las ventas del 2002, 94 escuelas de la lista de 136 habrán sido renovadas o reemplazadas. Una escuela, Wekiva High School, fue construida con fondos provenientes del impuesto sobre las ventas. Otras 43 nuevas escuelas de apoyo han sido construidas a partir del 2002 con otros fondos.

¿Qué otros fondos son empleados para la construcción de escuelas?

Una porción (1.5 mill.) de los impuestos a la propiedad requerida por el gobierno y de las tarifas de impacto en construcciones nuevas son la fuente principal de fondos para las escuelas de apoyo financiero. Existen otras pequeñas fuentes estatales y federales, pero representan una fracción de los fondos disponibles.

¿Por qué no logró completarse la totalidad de las 136 escuelas en la lista?

Los factores principales fueron la recesión económica y la Enmienda sobre el Tamaño de las Clases. El avance de la Enmienda Constitucional sobre el Tamaño de las Clases creó una necesidad de aproximadamente $600 millones en fondos que quedaron descubiertos. Se espera que la recesión económica haya causado un déficit de aproximadamente $600 millones con respecto a los estimados originales. 

¿Habrá un replanteamiento de prioridades de las escuelas de la lista de 136 que quedaron sin concluir?

En consejo escolar ha decidido permanecer con el orden de las escuelas restantes.

¿Realmente se necesitan nuevas escuelas? ¿No ha disminuido el crecimiento lo suficiente como para arreglárselas con lo que hay y simplemente agregar salones portátiles?

Ese no es el caso en el Condado Orange. Durante el año escolar 2012-2013, el distrito escolar recibió 2.000 estudiantes nuevos, lo cual equivale a más de dos nuevas escuelas primarias o una y media escuela secundaria. Para el año escolar 2013-2014, el OCPS agregó otros 3.000 estudiantes. Por eso nuestras comunidades necesitan de estas escuelas.

¿Por qué el OCPS no hace una rezonificación del distrito para maximizar la capacidad?

El permitir las transferencias voluntarias de escuelas sobrepobladas a escuelas por debajo de su capacidad está ya encargándose de eso. Sin embargo, aun con las transferencias voluntarias, las escuelas continúan sobrepobladas, y con sólo unos pocos miles de estudiantes nuevos al año, empeorará la situación si no actuamos ahora. Para el 15 de octubre de 2013, el número de estudiantes y la capacidad total del distrito excedía en 5.126 estudiantes, para las escuelas tradicionales.

¿Cuándo exactamente culminará el impuesto original sobre las ventas?

El día 31 de diciembre de 2015.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *